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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
, foreign policy. bad news for president obama because -- >> in the history of presidents of the united states, he's our worst at foreign policy. >> this is a very weak ill-conceived foreign policy. every place you look is failure. >> the jimmy carter years look like the good old days compared to where we are right now. >> the president has communicated weakness. >> jon: weakness in foreign policy! obama is weaker than coolidge in foreign policy! weaker than polk! weaker than president flinchington j. craphispants. (laughter) as you know, the only president in united states history who ever had his wallet stolen by a baby. (laughter) you don't hear as much about old president craphispants. (laughter) but given obama's foreign policy record, this debate is going to be a bloodbath. >> i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. drones are being used in drone strikes and i support that entirely. and feel the president was right. i want to underscore the same point the president made. i felt the same as the president did. i supported his action there. absolutely the right thing to do
foreign policy to make it more multilateral, part of what he calls a broader shift. aft a dade in whi we fought two wars that cost us dearly, in blood and treasure, the united states is turning our attention to the vast potential of the asia-pacific region. >> reporter: obama turned his attention at home to pushing through health care reform, something president after president had tried to do. he succeeded with what became known as obama care, the most significant overhaul since medicare and medicaid in the 1960s. he pushed to shore up banks aftethe financial crisis. congress passed legislation two years ago imposing stricter regulations on financial institutions and giving more protection to customers. reforming the nation's finances has proved more difficult. republicans criticize obama for the mounting national debt, and they say the unemployment rate, 7.8%, is unacceptably high. >> the latest poll suggests the candidates are running close, but they were taken before the storm hit shore. earlier gene otani spoke about obama's successes and his failures. >> the president is not the fi
" conversation. this week, a spotlight on the issue of foreign policy in the campaign. i'm joined by two long-time military correspondents who have each written fascinating new books on the topic, tom ricks, former "washington post" reporter and author of "the generals, american military command from world war ii to today" and michael gordon from the "new york times" here with "the end game, the inside story of the struggle for iraq from george w. bush to barack obama." welcome to both of you. great to be able to talk to both of you here. the close of this campaign. it is very interesting to hear both president obama and mitt romney look in their rearview mirror about the last decade in foreign policy and national security policy and the president saying, look, i ended the war in iraq, we are on a glide path out of afghanistan. and yet we know the threat from both of these countries still remains and there's a lot of unfinished business. michael, you get to a lot of that of course in your book, in iraq. the idea that we're done. put it in the rear view mir but there's a lot of unfinished busi
. >> monday night, third and final presidential debate was on foreign policy. and the most sensitive and dangerous foreign policy issue, which is the bomb. >> as long as i'm president of the united states iran will not get a nuclear weapon. >> a nuclear iran number clear capable iran is unacceptable to americ israel. and if israel is attacked, we have their back. >> if israel is attacked, america will stand with israel. >>> president obama and governor romney were largely in agreement on a range of foreign policy concerns. particularly those centering on the middle east. the ouster of former president mubarak of egypt, the 2014 exit date for afghanistan, the killing of terrorists with nutes romney and obama echoed each other. >> question. is bipartisanship now back in style at least when it comes to foreign policy in a presidential debate? pat buchanan? >> no it isn't but they are moving toward consensus where the american people are at. they are both pro israel, going to stand beside them. both very hawkish toward iran, although they don't want war in the middle east again. they don
of ideas as to how to cast foreign policy in response to 9/11, such as invading iraq and people were actually advocating this well before we had the 9/11 terrorist attacks. making regime change in iraq the official policy of federal government actually occurred during the clinton administration when the iraq liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservat
united on foreign policy either. but they're closer. my newshour colleague, margaret warner, is in washington and has our report about that. >> thanks maria. as the campaign hurtles toward election day, much of the foreign policy debate has focused on a few, deadly hours on an infamous date. the attack in benghazi on september 11th that killed u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans has led to a raft of sharp questions, accusations and recriminations. >> there were many days that passed before we knew whether we knew if this was a spontaneous demonstration or actually whether it was a terrorist attack. how could we not have known? >> i immediately made sure, number one, we did everything we could to secure those americans who were still in harm's way and most importantly, that we would go after those who killed americans and we would bring them to justice and that's exactly what we are going to do. >> but whether the president wins reelection, or governor romney takes the office, a dizzying array of broader challenges awaits overseas. romney says he'd restore
that senator paul had missed distinction from most of the republicans in the senate on the foreign policy issues, but that he seems to think he has the momentum going forward and is kind of playing a longer game when it comes to how these things work. host: i want to ask you about a piece in the morning paper that you wrote, the president's focus on big bird, binders and baionets may backfire. >> i had some interesting conversations with people that conduct these polls. you answer your phone, who are you going to vote for? these are telling me that the tactics that president obama is using, talking about diners, bayonets and big birds, they're rubbing people the wrong way. in part because they want to focus on jobs in the economy, which is this big, darker issue that the country is facing right now. it's worrying people a lot. and so, the idea that he can talk about things like the binders comment, which is really just a play off a comment that mitt romney made during the presidential debate, where he talks about his desire to hire a lot of women. and it's not helping him. i think that's
and republican presidential hopeful mitt romney debated issues of foreign policy and the economy, we turn to world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author, and mit professor noam chomsky. in a recent speech, professor chomsky examined topics largely ignored or glossed over during the campaign -- from china to the arab spring, to global warming and the nuclear threat posed by israel versus iran. he spoke last month at the university of massachusetts in amherst, at any event sponsored by the center for popular economics. his talk was entitled, "who owns the world?" >> when i was thinking about these remarks, i had two topics in mind. i could not decide between them. pretty obvious ones. one topic is, what are the most important issues that we face? the second topic is, what issues are not being treated seriously or at all in the quadrennial frenzy now under way called in election? but i realize that there is no problem. it is not a hard choice. they are the same topic. there are reasons for it, which are very significant in and of themselves. i would like to return to that in a momen
remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the concept of talking a little bit about domestic policy. and here, let me just start off by what seems to be a paradoxical situation, when assessing egypt's domestic landscape. because i'm the one hand, on the level of politics we have truly momentous change in egypt. however, on the level of policy, i would argue that we have much more continuity than change. on the level of politics, the election of president mohamed morsi was truly a landmark event in egypt's political history. he was the first civilian elected to the office of the presidency in egypt. he is also the first islamist to be elected as head of state in any arab country in free and fair elections. and that the islamist movement in question of course is the most impressive by far, the largest and most well-established islamist movement in the world of political islam. so truly momentous change on the level of politics. however, i would argue on the level of policy, we hav
." >> this is on foreign policy. the american ambassador to libya was recently killed. syria has defended -- descended into civil war. united states sends hundreds of billions of dollars in federal aid to countries around the world democracies and dictators. what should be the basic guiding principles of american foreign policies? >> fundamentally, i would have to say that freedom is something we need to encourage across the world. that me talk about christopher's stevens and what happened. his death along with three others is a tragedy, and that has been in a lot of people's thoughts and prayers. we need to get to the bottom of that, and i'm not here to speculate on who did what, but we need to find out and the american people need to know. i hope it will be transparent and can be clear so, two things will come out of it. people need to be held accountable, but also we can learn from that, so in the future if we have diplomats abroad we can ensure we are protecting them. as it relates to other countries, and there is turmoil in the middle east, from my perspective, that is one thing that we have don
for discussion. clinton and the eu foreign policy chief met with the kosovan present. >> clinton and ashton are touring balkan countries currently. london's police may be selling their famous new scotland yard headquarters to cut costs. they need to find over 600 million euros of savings and help the complex can fetch a large chunk of that sum. >> city police moved into the iconic building on victoria street in 1967. with staff cuts on the way, they will not need as much space. >> we will be back in one minute with more. >> stick around. we will be right back. >> welcome back. it is deja vu all over again. florida and ohio are expected to be key swing states in determining the outcome of the u.s. presidential election. >> some are saying that romney must win florida to win the race. the southern state has a high percentage of latino voters as well as senior citizens, many of home are worried about their benefits. >> polls show the candidates are neck-and-neck. >> hold on tight. irene takes me on a fast pace tour of the retirement community in her golf cart. florida is home to many retirees,
in iran. thank you. [applause] [inaudible] senior professorial lecturer foreign-policy domestic university. give a book coming up, so going to tehran [inaudible] she's the ceo of strategy which she is a co-author www.race for iran. and also coming of a bio here you can write, but hillary also has extensive service in the us government and national security council policy planning staff was one of the few american diplomats in power to negotiate with iran in 2001 and 2002 about afghanistan and other issues. sibley of a person with some first-hand knowledge shared. >> thank you very much. thank you, dr. mattair. it's good to see some friends and student from american university. thank you again for having me. 50 years ago this month, the united states faced perhaps the defining challenge of the cold war and the cuban missile crisis. today, some say we are facing a similar defining test of u.s. foreign policy and how we do with the islamic republic of iran. in this context, it's striking to recall the words of then president john f. kennedy. he warned us as americans that the great enemy of t
. >> were going to move onto a topic, a foreign policy question. congresswoman, you come to obama administration of course we seem has been criticized for its handling of the deadly attack on u.s. consulate in libya. this attack resulted in the death of ambassador chris stevens but we also now know that he made multiple attempts to get more security and that these efforts went unheeded. do you believe that the obama administration mishandled the situation even after and also in the aftermath of the attack? what could have been done better and should be done better going forward? hochul: absolutely mishandled, and to learn how that their cries for help from people asking for additional support, and to know they were unanswered is unacceptable. estimate of the house armed service committee when we get back to washington will conduct oversight hearings and make sure that our ambassadors and all the consulate personnel across this globe are protected. we've got to make sure they have within me. i would not do as republican leadership in congress, cut $300 million from embassy security
night, the presidential debate was on foreign policy, andrew's question is about foreign policy. andrew, welcome. please, ask your question. >> [inaudible] >> moderator: okay, thank you. i think we had a mic problem, andrew, but i'll restate the question. andrew said, does current u.s. foreign policy in the middle east undermine our national security? do you agree or disagree? what steps should be taken in foreign policy in the middle east? mr. mourdock? one minute. mourdock: well, our foreign policy is of critical concern, of course, and in the middle east we must always, first and foremost, stand by our great friend, israel, and also we must be making the message that no options can be taken off the table as we look towards a nuclear iran. but to the bigger point of our national security, you know, it was the former head of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mullen, that said the greatest threat to our national security is our own national debt. the fact that we have now spent ourselves into a $16 trillion debt is inexcusable. the fact that we continue to see the debt limit raised and
states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will be just fine for the islamic republic. even
obama on foreign policy, which they still prefer president obama on foreign affairs. >> you think the administration is withholding information that could serve them? this isn't an administration when they did the raid on bin laden, seal team six, they had a ton of information, a lot that should never have been released, served them well and they released it almost immediately and scandalously open way. it exposed our meths about our people. this is not an administration which has shown itself to be a keeper of secrets that would help it. the drone attacks. i mean on all of this. leaks when it will help them. here we know that they know stuff, what happened in the nine hours when they had real-time information and knew what was happening? where was the president? why wasn't he directing actions? who were the ones that contr contramanded any assistance? where was the president when it happened? all of that, the president knows. it won't serve them. that is why he is not saying it. wait until after the election or after he is forced, otherwise you will not hear it. this is not an ad
copy will not be festooned with all these post-it notes. as well as the politics and foreign policy editor at slate. he goes to the foreign newsmagazine and when he was the managing editor of foreign policy magazine counted twice won the award for general excellence, which i can tell you with a good feat in itself and particularly impressive given that foreign policy is a relatively small circulation journal, not a deep-pocketed magazines like "vanity fair" or "esquire." both articles and essays have appeared in "the new york times," "washington post" and "wall street journal" and his provide analysis for abc, cnn, msnbc and npr. he's in washington d.c. her very happy to have them with us here today. [applause] the dictators learning curve is a look at an arms race, speaking metaphorically that dictators and democratic activist trying to overthrow and both sides have had to up their game in recent years. for those of you who think foreign policy is about trade agreements, arms treaties come arcing border disputes, let me assure you it's a lively read a stun dobson's travels across t
foreign policy questions and touched on a matter, which i know is not the appointment on the board of the european central bank, which was raised by a man by your president at the beginning of the meeting. the union's commitment to promote the equality of women and men is an objective they done in the treaty. yesterday's to buy your economic committee on the appointment is an understandable expression of concern that a great deal remains to be achieved. notably regarding the european central bank. i note also the committee's recognition that the candidates consequences are in no way disputes here for my part, last week's european council, i made a strong appeal to all heads of state of government identified and oppose female candidates at european level. the economic and financial sectors, with the other representation of women is placed. i underlined that we need to be active in encouraging this process. i hope that this such renewed commitment to gender balance, parliament would base its position on the current candidate on the sole criteria of professional qualification and expe
.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year career. >> the military has great cadel lenni to respond. i would say that the military is much better suited to the emergency -- we have a terrific logistics capability. we have accumulated medical and medical related capability. >> we found of the decade of military and health challenges has spread many solutions particularly in the way we provide medical care to those wounded on the battlefield. >> we learn that
diplomacy in the region, and it's part of secretary clinton's economic state agenda. for foreign policy goals, the bottom line is that we need to create more links between the new democracies and american industry. we don't have enough of them. let me conclude by repeating what i said at the outset. there are daunting challenges throughout the region. we need no more proof the that attack in september that took the life of four of our own, and left scars in north africa, but president obama made clear no american violence makes america retreat from the region. we'll bring justice to harm us and our friends, but we will not be detoured from siding with history. we will support our allies, we'll partner with the new democracies to achieve the aspirations of our people. we will be partners. you know, in the last few weeks, i have been reminded of my first trip to north africa. this was early in 2010. i had only been in this job for a few months, and it was before the advent of the arab spring, and i was there to talk to a number of our north african business leaders and educators about pnb
of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governments and ninth society organizations and has grown to include 57 -- now 57 countries and over 300 commitment organizations reaching more than 2 billion teeple, all in just one year. some other countries have already joined her in the process of joining, which i think is a good thing for many arab countries. the partnership is an international airport to improve government performance, encourage participation and enhanced government participation to people and governments throughout the globe. the urban governor partnership of transparency, citizen, protection and accountability. the highlight of the policy of the united state is the memorandum of understanding for corporations that were assigned to the arab league
of political reforms or two sides of the same coin. this is the syria way. very much foreign policy as well and elected by both sides of the fence. assad did his job well. he constructed an airtight array of family travel, sectarian-based patronage system that produced loyalties and stability. and as for my good friends in damascus wrote last year, he said quote, for the regime its supporters and its allies, syria is an amateur society, a positive with evidence both real and effective and generally blown out of proportion a series of sideshows violent and seditious proclivities that can be contained only by ruthless power structure, unquote ultimately bashar and his followers cannot trust anyone else in syria. is initial strategic vision for international respected and integrated syria became consumed by syrian paradigm of political survival. he was either unwilling or powerless to stop the response to perceived threats. he returned it to me typically authored touring mode of survival your and alawite fortress to protect, the various governments of syria that co-opted over the years to prot
foreign policy in asia. it is not because of [inaudible] , not because of civilization, but there is a more recent incident where libya [inaudible] it is because of an emerging global war that is being triggered by middle east. now, let me give you a little bit of context. you know, context is sort of like underwear. you don't need a lot of it, but you have to have it first. [laughter] in the past, we thought of the great powers is being the main powers. russia and the u.s. in the past. china, maybe india, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria,
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)